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all your fears are caused from novel reading, 2018
glass vases, mirror, packing tape, wax paper, c-stands, digital print on vinyl
130 H x 108 W x 80 D inches
all your fears are caused from novel reading, 2018
glass vases, mirror, packing tape, wax paper, c-stands, digital print on vinyl
130 H x 108 W x 80 D inches

See at:

Beautiful Test Sites / Now I am become death
Mitchell Squire and Nora Wendl

Sanitary Tortilla Factory
401 – 403 2nd St SW
Albuquerque, New Mexico, 87102

July 13 – August 31, 2018
Opening Reception: Friday, July 13, 2018, 6 – 9 pm


Press Release:

In Beautiful Test Sites / Now I am become death, Mitchell Squire and Nora Wendl make full use of their research-based and architecturally-founded practices to present a series of photographs that meditate upon “beautiful test sites”: spaces and bodies wastelanded by the American techno-utopian imagination of the 20th century. For Squire, this means unearthing a series of inherited mid-20th century photographs taken by an amateur photographer—who at the time served as Executive Secretary of the Iowa Industrial and Defense Commission (1941-45), the first Director of the Iowa Development Commission (1945-53), and State Director of Civil Defense during WWII and again in the 1950s—and whose subjects were both women and nuclear blasts, whose images Squire alters through the strategic use of gilded frames, veils, and glass vases. Nora Wendl presents a series of photographs taken during her recent occupational performance of the all-glass Farnsworth House, designed by Mies van der Rohe for Dr. Edith Farnsworth in the mid-20th century—a house that was conceived the same year as the first American nuclear test. Wendl pairs these with a series of archival photographs of women within this house who have commonly been mistaken as being Dr. Farnsworth, which she heavily annotates with autobiographical and biographical information, thus bringing specificity to women who are otherwise anonymous within the visual discourse of architectural history: researcher and subject alike.

The mode of operation in viewing visual information today, and particularly photographs, is that even a casual observer must work as a journalist to determine veracity. At the same time, the photograph is a way to arrest beauty, to prolong it, and to catalog even those places and bodies that are wastelanded until a future time when they can be read and named.